2020
Lou Sidley, A Story by Andrew Price
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Residue Menu by Ingrid Berthon-Moine

Residue Menu by Ingrid Berthon-Moine

Residue Menu

The Residue Menu finds its origins in a series of photographs of Ingrid Berthon-Moine’s sink hole that she has taken over the years. The trapping of these discarded bits of food pushed her to research how to accommodate those overlooked remnants and make them the main protagonists of the recipes experimented for the Open Space Kitchen Takeover. During her takeover, Ingrid sold some of her drawings online, with all funds donated to the charity foodbank Trussell Trust.

Pain Perdu
2 eggs
50 cl milk
50 g sugar

– In a bowl, combine the eggs, sugar and milk (you can add some flavouring in the mixture such as vanilla, orange blossom water, cinnamon, rum etc.).
– Cut bread in 2 cm thick slices, then immerse them in the mixture.
– In a hot pan, melt the butter, and cook the slices in the butter noisette for 3 to 4 minutes on each side.Serve the French toast warm or lukewarm and for more intensity, sprinkle with icing sugar. You can also add fresh fruit, coulis, yogurt or bacon.

Carrot Top Pesto
90 g carrot tops (only the leaves without the stems)
65 g of almond powder (or any nuts you have at home)
65 g of parmesan
2 garlic cloves, peeled and germ taken out
130 g of olive oil
A grinding of black pepper

– Wash the carrot tops.
– Remove the stems and keep only the leaves.
– Peel the garlic.
– Put the carrot tops, garlic, almonds, black pepper and 1/3 of the oil in your blender. Mix.
– Then gradually pour in the remaining oil until you obtain the desired consistency. You may not need all the oil, or you may need to add a little extra.
– Keep in the fridge covered with film until serving.
– Can be eaten with pasta, fish, meat and used in quiches or for an aperitif with bread or veggie sticks.

Cauliflower Leaves Stir Fry
the leaves of a cauliflower (or 2, depending on the abundance of foliage)
1 large clove of garlic
2 cm fresh grated ginger
juice of 1/2 lime
2 tbsp of nuoc mam (fish sauce) or soy sauce, for a vegetarian version
1 tbsp coconut oil (or another cooking oil)
1 handful of coriander leaves
1 little lime zest
1 handful of coarsely chopped roasted peanuts (optional)

– Leaf the cauliflower. Set aside the 2-3 slightly faded outer leaves or those with slightly hard ribs for a soup.
– Wash and spin the leaves. Stack them by 4 or 5 and mince them finely.
– Put the wok to heat. Add the coconut oil – be careful not to smoke it. Brown the garlic quickly and add the grated ginger.
– Mix, then add the chopped cauliflower leaves.
– Mix continuously for 2-3 minutes. Add the soy or fish sauce depending on your version. Cover and cook, stirring every minute for 5 minutes.
– Check the doneness. If the leaves are not cooked enough to your liking, extend for a few minutes.
-Grate a little lime zest over the wok and drizzle with lime juice and mix again.
– Serve sprinkled with chopped coriander and roasted peanuts.

Whisky Sour
3 parts Bourbon
2 parts lemon juice
1 part syrup
1 fresh egg white

– Shake!

Orangettes
3 organic orange skins
300 g of dark chocolate
150 gr sugar
10 cl of water
Coarse salt

– Wash and dry the oranges.
– Peel them, removing the skin in quarters.
– Scrape off the white skin, but leave a little.
– Blanch 3 times: put a saucepan of water to boil. When the water boils, immerse the whole rind in it (with a little coarse salt in the 1st blanching to remove the bitterness), wait until the water returns to boil and drain in a colander. Repeat this operation 2 times.
– Take 10 cl of cooking water and drain.
– Cut the rind into strips.
– Prepare a syrup with the sugar and the cooking water. Heat this syrup without caramelizing, and dip the orange strips in it.
– Continue cooking on very low heat for 1 hour or more, until the rind becomes slightly translucent.
– Let cool a little, but not harden.
– Melt the chocolate in a bain-marie (not in the microwave), and dip the bark in it, small handfuls at a time. Coat well with chocolate (but not too much).
– Remove the bark one by one, and let it harden on parchment paper. Cool in the fridge.

Labié Nanan or Pineapple Beer
700 gr of pineapple bark
100 gr of ginger
1.5l of mineral water
cane sugar to taste
spices: cinnamon, nutmeg, star anise, vanilla

A recipe from Guyana, Labié Nanan or ananas beer reuses the peel of the pineapple.
– Clean the bark very well. Chop the peeling and grate the ginger. Leave the mixture to macerate with water in the fridge for three days. Filter the liquid and add sugar and any spices you fancy such as cinnamon, nutmeg, vanilla.

Ingrid Berthon-Moine is a French visual artist based in London. At the core of her practice is an interest in the de/construction of gender identity and its behavioural consequences in our society. Conversations are key to her practice, either through discussion or written exchange. Lived experiences, testimonies or reactions to a given text are interpreted into abstract figurative sculptures and paintings. Humour is also brought into play and acts as a connector. The human body is seen as a sensitive receptor which bears the visual traces of our emotional turmoil and is also a source of information and power not to be neglected.